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Chen, Jie-Qi, Gardner, Howard, and Moran, Seana. Multiple intelligences around the world. San Franciso: Jossey-Bass, 2009.

Multiple intelligences (MI) theory has been introduced and implemented successfully in numerous countries around the world. This is the first collection to review, synthesize, and reflect on this unique cross-cultural and educational phenomenon. Through this synthesis and reflection, the book’s authors provide a fresh and fuller understanding of MI theory. In addition, they develop more specific knowledge about why MI theory has been welcomed in so many countries, how its use can be appropriate in diverse cultures, and what has supported and fueled travel of the MI meme.

Erickson, Lynn H. Concept-based curriculum and instruction for the thinking classroom. Thousand Oaks: Corwin Press, 2007

This indispensable guide combines proven curriculum design with teaching methods that encourage students to learn concepts as well as content and skills for deep understanding across all subject areas.

Gerzon, Mark. Global citizens. Rider, 2010.

We are all aware of the number of global problems that need to be solved in order to save the future of the world: financial crises, the environment and terrorism, to name a few. But as the author makes clear, it is not enough for us to wait for governments and international companies to sort things out. We all have to realise our global common ground amidst differences everywhere in our lives, both at home and at work, locally and abroad. At the moment we are putting forward piecemeal solutions to global issues when we really need to start seeing ourselves as citizens of the world if we are to effect real change. Only when we have all truly become ‘global citizens’ does he believe we will become fully-fledged members of the human race, and start to solve the many crises facing our world.

Jensen, Eric. Enriching the brain: how to maximize every learner’s potential. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2006.

Drawing from a wide range of neuroscience research as well as related studies, Jensen reveals that the human brain is far more dynamic and malleable than we earlier believed. He offers a powerful new understanding of how the brain can be “enriched,” across the board to maximize learning, memory, behavior and overall function. The bottom line is we have far more to do with how our children’s brains turn out than we previously thought.

Medina, John. Brain rules: 12 principles for surviving and thriving at work, home, and school. Seattle: Pear Press, 2008.

In Brain Rules, Dr. John Medina, a molecular biologist, shares his lifelong interest in how the brain sciences might influence the way we teach our children and the way we work. In each chapter, he describes a brain rule – what scientists know for sure about how our brains work – and then offers transformative ideas for our daily lives.

Pink, Daniel H. Drive: the surprising truth about what motivates us. New York: Riverhead Books, 2009.

Drawing on four decades of scientific research on human motivation, Pink exposes the mismatch between what science knows and what business does—and how that affects every aspect of life. He demonstrates that while carrots and sticks worked successfully in the twentieth century, that’s precisely the wrong way to motivate people for today’s challenges. In Drive, he examines the three elements of true motivation—autonomy, mastery, and purpose—and offers smart and surprising techniques for putting these into action.

Ritchart, Ron. Intellectual Character. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2002.

What does it really mean to be intelligent? Ron Ritchhart presents a new and powerful view of intelligence that moves beyond ability to focus on cognitive dispositions such as curiosity, skepticism, and open mindedness. Arguing persuasively for this new conception of intelligence, the author uses vivid classroom vignettes to explore the foundations of intellectual character and describe how teachers can enculturate productive patterns of thinking in their students. Intellectual Character presents illustrative, inspiring stories of exemplary teachers to help show how intellectual traits and thinking dispositions can be developed and cultivated in students to promote successful learning. This vital book provides a model of authentic and powerful teaching and offers practical strategies for creating classroom environments that support thinking.

Stigler, James W., and James Hiebert. The teaching gap: best ideas from the world’s teachers for improving education in the classroom. New York: Free Press, 1999.

The authors draw on the conclusions of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) — an innovative new study of teaching in several cultures — to refocus educational reform efforts. Using videotaped lessons from dozens of randomly selected eighth-grade classrooms in the United States, Japan, and Germany, the authors reveal the rich, yet unfulfilled promise of American teaching and document exactly how other countries have consistently stayed ahead of us in the rate their children learn. Our schools can be restructured as places where teachers can engage in career-long learning and classrooms can become laboratories for developing new, teaching-centered ideas. If provided the time they need during the school day for collaborative lesson study and plan building, teachers “will” change the way our students learn.

Williams, Jessica. 50 facts that should change the world. Cambridge: Icon Books, 2004.

A book of facts that address a broad range of global issues. Each is followed by a short essay explaining the story behind the fact, fleshing out the bigger problem lurking behind the numbers. Real-life stories, anecdotes and case studies help to humanize the figures and make clear the human impact of the bald statistics. The facts paint a picture of a world of inequality: unheard-of and often ludicrous prosperity living alongside crippling poverty. Some of the facts will make you rethink things you thought you knew. Some illustrate long-term, gradual changes in our society. Others concern local issues that people face in their everyday lives

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